RESEARCH FEATURES MAGAZINE

Physycs of the Sun and astronaut safety in the new era of space exploration

Check out the article about us on Research Features!

Article Link: physics-and-astronaut-safety

Magazine Website: researchfeatures.com

As Associate Professor at the University of Hawai‘i, Dr Veronica Bindi and her team are analysing data from a unique instrument on the International Space Station to investigate high-energy particles originating from the galaxy and the Sun itself. A comprehensive understanding of these particles, their origin and transport processes will increase our understanding of the universe, solar physics and help to protect instruments and astronauts on future space missions [...]
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MY YEAR IN SPACE

Colonel Mike Fincke, USAF (ret)

THURSDAY, 5 OCTOBER 2017, 7.30pm

UH Manoa Bilger Bldg, Room 152

Open to the public, Free admission

Summary of the Talk

Colonel Mike Fincke, USAF (ret) is a spaceflight veteran with over 381 days in space and 9 spacewalks.
He will share some of his adventures in space including what daily life is aboard the International Space Station (ISS) as well as some of the groundbreaking science that has been produced on the ISS. Currently waiting for his next flight, Colonel Fincke is the lead Astronaut for the United States’ next two space ships that will take crew to the ISS, Space-X’s Dragon and Boeing’s Starliner. He will share updates on the development of those spacecraft as well as NASA’s plans to fly beyond Low Earth Orbit with NASA’s new Orion spacecraft.

Future Focus 2017 and connection to the University of Hawaii

Colonel Fincke will be in Honolulu as key note speaker to the Future Focus 2017 (Hilton Hawaiian Village October 4th and 5th, 2017).

For more information about the Future Focus 2017

Colonel Fincke was mission specialist on the penultimate Space Shuttle mission, STS-134, which launched on May 16, 2011. This flight delivered the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) instrument to the International Space Station, where it will operate until 2024.
AMS is a state-of-the-art particle detector that measures cosmic rays, antimatter and dark matter in space.

The University of Hawaii plays a big role in the data analysis of the AMS experiment.
At the Physics Department of the University of Hawaii, Professor Veronica Bindi and her team collaborate with NASA in using AMS data to improve the radiation shields for future manned missions to Mars.

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Please join us for an evening of space and spaceflight!